2010/12/31

REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Examiner


Fistful of Mercy's debut album As I Call You Down is a throwback, in a sense, to 60s and 70s style folk music, with pristine acoustics, soothing vocal harmonies and back-to-basics lyrics addressing everything from love to family ties.

The first track of the nine on the CD is "In Vain or True," a wonderful blending of Beatles-ish fervor and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young-type harmonies, a memorable start to the lucid compilation. The other tracks range from artfully instrumental to delightfully rootsy. "Father's Son" is a crunchy bluegrass, gospel-like tune full of knee-slapping vigor, reminiscent of Paul Simon's Love Me Like a Rock. In contrast, "30 Bones" is a hushed, lush acoustic; deft guitar picking paired with the sweet strains of the violin. "Restore Me" and "With Whom You Belong" are inspirational, resonant songs, capturing the new group's ideal blending of voices. "Things Go Round" is a trip-happy tune, with a sparse, open sound; only a keyboard highlights the in-and-out vocals. One of the most ethereal, entrancing songs on the soon-to-be-released disc is "Fistful of Mercy," an achingly beautiful ballad with Harper carrying the lead vocals and Harrison and Arthur enhancing the haunting melody with their honeyed intoning.

Dhani Harrison, Ben Harper, and Joseph Arthur have created exquisite, sincere songs that are organic in sound and elemental in design, coalesced by fluid rhythms. For a first outing, this power-trio has put together something mellow yet potent, an all-together pleasant aural cocktail. As I Call You Down is due for release on October 5, 2010, on Hot Records.


TAB : FISTFUL OF MERCY - AS I CALL YOU DOWN (2010)




Click on a title to see the tab.



"I Don't Want to Waste Your Time"
"Father's Son"
"30 Bones"
"Things Go 'Round"




LYRICS : I Don't Want To Waste Your Time



I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time

But I will, yes I will, yes I will
If you give me a reason
And then I won't, no I won't, no I won't
If you get to pleasin'

'Cuz I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time

But I will, yes I will, yes I will
If you give me a reason
And then I won't, no I won't, no I won't
If you get to pleasin'

It's only Monday
And I'm already laughing
Which is strange 'cuz on Sunday
You had me crying

I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time
I don't want to waste your time



LYRICS : As I Call You Down


You love like I love 
You love like I do 
You wish what I wish 
You know what I knew 
I wish I knew you 

You see what I see 
I see what we do 
You fall when I fall 
As we both follow through 
As we both follow you 

When I fall inside a hole 
That I can't crawl out 
Better give up my control
As I call you down 
When I fall inside a hole 
That I can't crawl out 
Better give up my control
As I call you down
As I call you down 
As I call you down 

As I call you down 

You give like I give 
You know how I ache 
We all became so poor 
There's nothing left to take 
I break when you break 

You fall like I fall 
As far as I fall 
You call how I call 
We're indivisible 
Inside invisible 

When I fall inside a hole 
That I can't crawl out 
Better give up my control
As I call you down 
When I fall inside a hole 
That I can't crawl out 
Better give up my control
As I call you down 
As I call you down 


LYRICS : Father's Son



My father he done told me
To never ever hurt no one
But now I'm sick and mad and I've been caught red handed
Hell I'm still my father's son

I lay awake till daylight
A pillow and a gun
And if my secret dreams could be seen on screen
Then they'll be coming for this one

I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord

Please Lord now forgive me
Even though I don't deserve
I never was too good and now
The Devil's all I serve

My woman she done left me
I told her twice to go
The first time she ignored me
But then I threw her on the floor

I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord

Well I sleep with one eye open
And I weep with both eyes closed
Time is comin' down on me
And tomorrow never knows

Haven't I suffered?
Haven't I suffered my fill?
And if you don't pray for me now
Nobody ever will

I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord

Now I'm in the graveyard
There's darkness all around
Voices floating through the air
Speaking with no sound

You were your father's son
But you left him far beyond
Beyond the reach of mercy
In the darkness of the sun

I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord
I'm so down Lord, better slow down Lord


  

LYRICS : Fistful Of Mercy



You say you feel life down
Always down against the grave you are
You say it's real life down
Always down against the grave we are

Maybe it's soft inside of hard
Fistful of mercy
Maybe it comes from where we are
Land of the thirsty, hungry
Lion heart

You say you feel life down
Always down against the grave you are
You say it's real life down
Always down against the grave we are

Maybe it's soft inside of hard
Fistful of mercy
Maybe it comes from where we are
Land of the thirsty, the hungry

We have a way of saving our own lives
We have a way of saving our own lives
We have a way of saving our own lives
Our own lives, our own lives 

Maybe it's soft inside of hard
Fistful of mercy
Maybe it comes from where we are
Land of the thirsty, the hungry

We have a way of saving our own lives
We have a way of saving our own lives
We have a way of saving our own lives
Our own lives, our own lives



LYRICS : Restore Me



Restore me restore me now 
And make me sane 
Restore me restore me now
I've got to give up your ghost 

You dream a lot about yourself 
And you dream harsh winds upon your friends
But you wanna kill the beast 
That lives up in your head 
And you wanna kill the beast 
That lives to see you dead 

You dream a lot about the past 
And you dream that it's never gonna last 
So you wanna give your love 
To your sister and your friends 
So you wanna give your love 
To the one who's facing the end 

You want it all but you've got to give
You want it all but you've got to forgive

Restore me restore me now 
And make me sane 
Restore me restore me now
I've got to give up your ghost 

Restore me restore me now 
And make me sane 
Restore me restore me now
I've got to give up your ghost
Restore me restore me now 
And make me sane 
Restore me restore me now
I've got to give up your ghost

You make me lonely
You make me lonely
You make me lonely
You make me lonely

You want it all but you've got to give 
You want it all but you've got to forgive

You dream a lot about the past 
And you dream that it's never gonna last



  

LYRICS : Things Go 'Round



I gotta make it out of this here gloom
There's a lot of innocents in this room
What would happen if things come round
There's no waiting baby and I mean right now

I didn't notice that your small door
Picking up adrenaline off the floor
Everything here is on the ground
Boundless, boundless, boundless, bound

These things go round
These things go round
These things go round
These things go
These things go round
These things go round

I walk around in my shell
Just a flesh and bone prison cell
My right hand says to my left
Just try and do your best

I'm a stop light on a city street
I'm a cop just walking his beat
I'm the sum of all my greed
I'm every hand in need

These things go round
These things go round
These things go round
These things go
These things go round and round

I'm gonna make it
You're gonna make it
We're gonna make it
Somehow
I'm gonna make it
You're gonna make it
We're gonna make it
I'm gonna make it
You're gonna make it
We're gonna make it
Somehow
I'm gonna make it
You're gonna make it
We're gonna make it
Somehow

These things go round
These things go round
These things go round and round
These things go round
These things go round

I didn't have to learn it so hard
Everything came quickly in my yard
I dropped a seed and the flowers grew
I met her needs and her birds flew

They flew the cage and they flew the sky
The tears of our love said goodbye
We kissed each other and said goodbye
But she came back to say hello again

These things go round
These things go round
These things go round
These things go
These things go round and round
These things go round
These things go round
These things go round
These things go
These things go round and round
Round and round



  

LYRICS : With Whom You Belong



You find your way 
To write your song 
And come what may 
I hope you find friends with whom you belong 
I said I hope you find friends with whom you belong

'Cuz you'll never know the reason
Why the seas rise and fall
You'll never know the reason
Or if there's a reason at all, reason at all

Make sure you stay 
When you find love in your heart 
And as it lights up your way 
Don't let your friends fall apart 
I said I hope you find friends with whom you belong
I said I hope you find friends with whom you belong
I said I hope you find friends with whom you belong

'Cuz you'll never know the reason
Why the seas rise and fall
You'll never know the reason
Or if there's a reason at all

'Cuz you'll never know the reason
Why the sun shines at all
You'll never know the reason
Why we each must one day fall, must one day fall

You find your way 
To write your song 
And come what may 
I hope you find friends with whom you belong 
I said I hope you find friends with whom you belong
I said I hope you find friends with whom you belong
I said I hope you find friends with whom you belong


LYRICS : In Vain Or True



Just 'cuz you say so don't make it true
Just 'cuz it's over don't mean we're through

I know how I feel for you
Is my love for you in vain or true 
Is my love for you in vain or true

Can you hear the voices singing to you 
With a little patience can't it be cool
I still remember why can't you 
Into the darkness born now anew

I know how I feel for you
Is my love for you in vain or true 
Is my love for you insane or true

I know how I feel for you
Is my love for you in vain or true 
Is my love for you insane or true
Is my love for you in vain or true 
Is my love for you insane or true

REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Rolling Stone


BY WILL HERMES October 5, 2010

Note : 3 of 5 stars





The story goes that Ben Harper, Joseph Arthur and Dhani "Son of George" Harrison conjured nine songs in three days for this supersession. It sounds like it. But there's charm in their debut's raggedness: See the three-part harmonies on "Restore Me," which cut through the opening scribble like sun through clouds. Harper brings his liquid acoustic slide, Arthur his exquisite melodic sense. Drum guru Jim Keltner helps knit it all together, while Harrison, the multi-instrumentalist kid of the group, also brings unmistakable pipes: When he sings, "I'm still my father's son," it's like, yes you are.

REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Relix.com


by Tim Donnely


When solo musicians come together and form a group for the sake of art and not commerce, the result kept can often be silenced due to contractual obligations of the participating artists. However, when it’s good art, nothing can hold it back, as is the case with As I Call You Down, the eponymous debut from Fistful of Mercy. 

The mellowest power trio besides CSN, the band consists of Ben Harper, Joseph Arthur and Dhani Harrison, who are all gentle souls known for their tender vocals. 
Recorded in one weekend in Los Angeles around last year’s Grammy Awards, the release doesn’t come off as a piecemeal offering featuring three different voices. 
Rather, it is focused, vibrant and most of all, a team orientated endeavor, as evidenced on the blues burner “Father’s Son” infectious psychedelic pop of “Things Go Round” featuring Harper on bass, Arthur on percussion and Harrison on keys. 

However, it’s the warm, lush, and seemingly effortless harmonies throughout the record, specifically on the title track and the closing beauty “With Whom You Belong” that make an obvious case that these cats belong together.


REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - AllMusic


AllMusic Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Note : 3 of 5 stars


Fistful of Mercy is entirely too aggressive a name for the ramshackle trio of Ben Harper, Joseph Arthur, and Dhani Harrison, a group of neo-hippies whose respective circles conjoined so they decided to strum some acoustic guitars together and see what happened. What happened was a collection of nine pleasant folk-rock tunes tinged with a little blues and a lot of softly psychedelic twists reminiscent of Dhani’s dad, George. 

The melodies may recall the elder Harrison but the overall feel is uncannily CSN at their softest, the harmonies always gentle and the tempos never moving any faster than a lazy stroll. The mellow vibes are appealing in their own lackadaisical way, but as the short LP approaches its conclusion it’s hard not to wish there was just a little more discipline, perhaps enough to sculpt these pleasant sounds into full songs.

REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - The Hurst Review



The first album from Fistful of Mercy is a laid-back, low-key, unpretentious treat– a most welcome development from a group that surely deserves to be called “super.” I give much of the credit for the music’s modesty and simple charms to Dhani Harrison; when your dad was one of the Beatles, keeping things relatively small-scale is probably the only way you’re ever going to get anywhere on your own, and everything I’ve heard and seen of the man has indicated a contentment with focusing on small gifts and the charms of straightforward, heartfelt musicianship. Harrison is joined in this trio by singer/songwriter Joseph Arthur and rock and roller Ben Harper, men who have, at various points in their substantial careers, engaged in musical conceits much broader and more grandiose than anything present on As I Call You Down; that they’re willing to work in such brotherly harmony together, producing something that surpasses any suggestions of ego or overreach in favor of more minor but lasting pleasures, is ultimately what makes Fistful of Mercy work– not because it’s a supergroup, but because the music here is simply very appealing.

The modesty of this nine-song record is evident from the outset: “In Vain or True” begins with folksy acoustic guitar strumming that quickly develops into a lovely Beatles-esque melody and warm three-part harmony. (I’m sorry to make the Beatles comparison, for Harrison’s sake, but it really is the most fitting analogy.) Herein reside the three basic gifts of this handsome little album– that is, melody, harmony, and, most impressively, a sense of genuine warmth that is hard to reproduce on record without sounding somewhat artificial, which it never does here, perhaps for reasons as simple as the fact that these three men actually enjoy each others’ company and captured the amiable spirit of their recording sessions with clarity and a lack of unnecessary fuss. And indeed, this is music that flows very organically, everything orbiting fairly close to the central fascinations with melody and vocal interplay but diverting into some lovely colors along the way, be it the soulful violin that appears at the end of that first song, the elegant piano and organ overtones that splash across “I Don’t Want to Waste Your Time,” or the bluesy slide guitar accents that Harper provides throughout the record.

The music is so comfortable in its gentle demeanor and amiable harmonies that the risk it runs is in growing too sleepy, something it does here and there, but mostly avoids thanks mainly to its brevity and focus. A bigger concern, I think, is that the music here is simply so modest that it’s easy to overlook, especially since the initial impression one gets is of the overall mood, the little details here and there, rather than of the songs themselves, which take a listen or two to begin to sink in. But there are some real pleasures here, enough to make immersion in the record a worthwhile pursuit. I’d point to four songs of special note, two because they highlight what this group captures so nicely and two because they suggest ways for the group to move forward on any future meetings. In the former camp I point to the song “Fistful of Mercy,” which doesn’t offer any deviations from the album’s basic template so much as it illuminates everything that’s so winsome about it, the three-way harmony vocal moving into positively heavenly territory and a mournful violin suggesting a certain romance, a fascination with simple, unfettered beauty. There’s also a fine instrumental number called “30 Bones”– contemplative, slightly on the bluesy tip– that suggests how deep the trio’s chemistry goes, even when the vocal harmonies are taken out of the equation.

On the other side of things there’s “Things Go Round,” a playful, almost theatrical number– again, with nods to the Beatles– that begins with staccato piano before eventually coming back to the swirl of voices and violin that characterizes much of the rest of this music. It’s a good showcase for the three different voices here, each of the singers taking a turn at the lead, but it’s also evidence of how this band’s music could be fleshed out without sounding too much like a departure. The real standout, though– and, admittedly, the most uncharacteristic song on the whole album– is “Father’s Son,” a bluesy, gospel-flavored hoe-down with hand-clap percussion from Jim Keltner and Harper’s slide guitar licks surrounding the driving guitar work from Arthur and Harrison. The arrangement is energetic in a way that much of the album isn’t, and the lyric toys with blues and country music idioms cleverly in its tale of sonship, inherited sin, and perhaps redemption. I’d be on board with an entire album of stuff like this; for now, though, Fistful of Mercy delivers a lovely record that is, despite its smallness of stature, rich with beauty and reward.



REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - L.A Times


Album review: Fistful of Mercy's 'As I Call You Down'
OCTOBER 5, 2010 | 6:46 PM


For a certain kind of guy who always seems to be swinging in a hammock somewhere, one bellbottomed leg kicked over the side, the harmonies of Crosby, Stills and Nash are sacrosanct, sometimes to the point of creative claustrophobia.

On Fistful of Mercy's debut, “As I Call You Down,” that isn't the case. Singer-songwriters Dhani Harrison, Ben Harper and Joseph Arthur are all confident enough to add their own wintry and sometimes endearingly gawky take on the Laurel Canyon formula. And, for the record, a photo in the liner notes shows them all wearing skinny jeans — the times have changed.

Most of the tracks on “As I Call You Down” seem made for dewy, slow-to-rise mornings, with lines of steel guitar and the kind of slightly cockeyed melodies that keep the listener poised for surprise. Sometimes a rambunctious mood sets in, as on country-blues stomper “Father's Son.” At other times, the threesome tucks in for meditation: “30 Bones,” the only instrumental track, is a gorgeous, feathery construction.

As pleasing as the melodies and execution are, it's hard to tell if the album has real sticking power — or if it merely passes through the system, appreciated but ultimately forgettable. Only time and more records will tell.

—Margaret Wappler

Fistful of Mercy
“As I Call You Down”
Hot Records
Three stars (Out of four)

REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - NZHerald.co.nz


By Graham Reid


Rating: 1/5

Verdict: If cream rises, this sinks like a lead samosa.

Further proof - if required - that something less than a supergroup can deliver something considerably less than super.

And this group - Ben Harper, the far-too-prolific singer-songwriter Joseph Arthur and Dhani (son of George) Harrison - come up so far short on every front that their folksy I Don't Want to Waste Your Time ("but I will, yes I will") could only be acceptable if it were delivered by Flight of the Conchords.

It's rubbish.

Unless it's a parody, which - regrettably - it isn't.Lyrics aren't their strong suit ("you love like I love, you love like I do, you wish what I wish ...", etc) and their template is the low end of Crosby, Stills and Nash - but with none of the cultural significance CSN enjoyed. FoM seem dislocated from their time, any guiding intelligence and a decent, memorable song.

Oh, aside from Father's Son (and yes, Dhani does sound like that) which has the sole virtue of rousing them from their self-satisfied Travelling Wilburys/CSN sleepwalk - although you can hardy hail a lyric that includes such blues cliches as "my father he done told me" and "my woman she done left me".

Rubbish Part II.

Further proof - if required - that it's far too easy to record an album these days.

Three days, apparently. Time wasted.

-TimeOut / elsewhere.co.nz

TAB : With Whom You Belong


Tabbed by: Rod Nolan
Email: rodnolan@gmail.com

Tuning: Standard with capo at 5th fret


Intro:
A C G (x2)

Verse 1:
A C G
You find your way
A C G
To write your song
A C G
And come what may
A
I hope you find friends
C G
With whom you belong
A
I said I hope you find friends
C G
With whom you belong


Chorus:
Em G
Cuz you'll never know the reason
C G
Why the seas rise and fall
Em G
You'll never know the reason
C G
Or if there's a reason at all
D
a reason at all


Verse 2:
A C G
Make sure you stay
A C G
When you find love in your heart
A C G
As it lights up your way
A C G
Don't let your friends fall apart
A
I said I hope you find friends
C G
With whom you belong
A
I said I hope you find friends
C G
With whom you belong

Chorus:
Em G
Cuz you'll never know the reason
C G
Why the seas rise and fall
Em G
You'll never know the reason
C G
Or if there's a reason at all
Em G
Cuz you'll never know the reason
C G
Why the sun shines at all
Em G
You'll never know the reason
C G
Why we each must one day fall
D
Must one day fall

Violin instrumental:
A C G (x4)


Verse 3:
A C G
You find your way
A C G
To write your song
A C G
And come what may
A
I hope you find friends
C G
With whom you belong
(repeat I hope you... until end)


 

TAB : Restore Me



C G Am F
You dream a lot about yourself
C G Am F
And you dream harsh winds upon your friends
C G
But you wanna kill the beast
Am F
That lives up in your head
C G
And you wanna kill the beast
Am F
That lives to see you dead
C G Am F
You dream a lot about the beast
C G Am F
And you dream that it's never gonna last
C G Am
F
So you wanna give your love to your sister and your friends
C G Am F C G
And you wanna give your love to the one who's facing the end
Am F C G
You want it all but you've got to give
Am F
You want it all but you've got to forgive
C G Am F
Restore me, restore me now and make me sane
C G Am F
Restore me, restore me now I got to give up your ghost (x2)
C G Am F
You make me lonely (x2)
C G
Am F C
G
You want it all but you've got to give
Am F
You want it all but you've got to forgive
C G Am F
You dream a lot about the past
C G Am F
And you dream that it's never going to last


 

TAB : In Vain Or True


Tabbed by Giorgio Pozzi


INTRO:
Am - D - D4 - D - D4 - D- Am
Am D - D4 - D - D4 - D - Am
Just 'cuz you say don't make it true
Am D - D4 - D - D4 - B
Just 'cuz it's over don't mean we're through
B Em
I know how I feel for you
Em Am D G
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Em Am D G G Am
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Am D - D4 - D - D4 - D - Am
Can you hear the voices singing to you?
AAm D - D4 - D - D4 - D - Am
With a little patience can't it be cool?
Am D - D4 - D - D4 - D - Am
I still remember why can't you?
Am D - D4 - D - D4 - D - B
Into the darkness born now anew
B Em
I know how I feel for you
Em Am D G
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Em Am D G
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Em Am D G
Em Am D G B
B Em
I know how I feel for you
Em Am D G
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Em Am D G
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Em Am D G
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Em Am D G
Is my love for you in vain or true?
Em - Am - D - G
Em - Am - D


 

TAB : Fistful Of Mercy


Tabbed by Sexytom (http://lostintheseventies.blogspot.com)
Comments, corrections: civetom@hotmail.com


Standard tuning : EADGBE
Capo III


Intro:
Am Dm F C G
Verse
Am Dm
You say you're feeling life down
F C G
Always down against the grave you are
Am Dm
You say you spin life down
F C G
Always down against the grave we are
Chorus:
Em Am
Baby it's soft inside of
F C
A fistful of Mercy
Em Am F
Maybe it comes from where we are
C G
The land of the thirsty hungry by your heart
Verse:
Am Dm
You say you're feeling life down
F C G
Always down against the grave we are
Am Dm
You say you swill life down
F C G
Always down against the grave you are
Chorus:
Em Am
Baby it's soft inside of
F C
A fistful of Mercy
Em Am F
Maybe it comes from where we are
C
The land of the thirsty
Em Am
Baby it's soft inside of
F C
A fistful of Mercy
Em Am F
Maybe it comes from where we are
Pge p
Nouveau document texte
C G
The land of the thirsty hungry
Bridge :
F Am
We have a way of saving in our own lives (wohoo hooho)
F Am
We have a way of saving in our own lives (wohoo hooho)
F Am
We have a way of saving in our own lives
F
our own lives
F
our own lives
F
our own lives
F
our own lives
[Ben's guitar Solo] on verse chords
Am Dm F C G
Am Dm F C G
Chorus:
Em Am
Baby it's soft inside of
F C
A fistful of Mercy
Em Am F
Maybe it comes from where we are
C G
The land of the thirsty hungry
Bridge :
F Am
We have a way of saving in our own lives (wohoo hooho)
F Am
We have a way of saving in our own lives (wohoo hooho)
F Am
We have a way of saving in our own lives
F
our own lives
F
our own lives...
(ad lib.)


 

TAB : As I Call You Down


Dm
You love like I love
You love like I do
You wish what I wish
C
You know what I knew
I wish I knew you
Dm
You see what I see
I see what we do
You fall when I fall
C
As we both follow through
As we both follow you
G7
Dm
When I fall inside a hole
Dm
That I can't crawl out
G7
Better give up my control
F
As I call you down
Dm / Dm / G7 / F
As I call you down
Dm
You give like I give
You know how I ache
We all became so poor
C
There's nothing left to take
I break when you break
Dm
You fall like I fall
As far as I fall
You call how I call
C
We're indivisible
Inside invisible
Dm
When I fall inside a hole
Dm
That I can't crawl out
G7
Better give up my control
F
As I call you down
Dm / Dm / G7 / F
As I call you down


REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Glide Magazine


October 14, 2010 by Shawn Donohue


Stop me if you heard this one; a group of successful folk-tinged singers come together to put down breezy album in-between solo projects. Yeah this undertaking is pretty common, dating back to the beginning of pop music and probably continuing this very moment in a studio somewhere. Fistful Of Mercy are Dhani Harrison, Ben Harper and Joseph Arthur who collaborated on tracks for the groups first album, As I Call You Down during all night sessions. Recorded in Los Angeles this disk has California flowing throw its grooves; never in a hurry to go anywhere musically instead relishing the trios harmonies and vocal interplay.

More akin to Crosby Stills and Nash then the recent Monsters of Folk, Fistful Of Mercy play with light and airy textures minus CSN’s political bent. Songs about love dominate as do violins and ultra repetitive choruses that allow the trio to mesh harmonically but never say anything lasting. The exceptions are the Harrison led “Father’s Son” and the quirky “Things Go Round” which wiggle into the ears. Too often the overloaded string production and acoustic guitars meander behind the trio of voices before floating away without leaving an impression. In the end you have a fine summer album that just doesn’t live up to the talent involved with its creation

COVERART : Fistful Of Mercy - Father's Son (Promo CD)





REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Metromix Chicago

Folk-rock supergroup crafts an intimate, hypnotic gem
By Alex Biese

Note : 4

The buzz: Supergroup alert! Dhani Harrison—son of the late Beatle George Harrison and an emerging star in his own right—has teamed up with rootsy guitar slinger Ben Harper and singer/songwriter Joseph Arthur to form the folksy ensemble Fistful of Mercy, and the group is releasing its debut album, "As I Call You Down."

The verdict: While the world probably wasn't clamoring to hear what a Harrison/Harper/Arthur collaboration would sound like, "As I Call You Down" is a disarming and effective debut. Employing tight, sunny harmonies in the tradition of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young—the gold standard of folk-rock supergroups—the men of Fistful of Mercy have come together to craft a mellow, intimate gem. Sounding much more natural together than the members of the similarly-minded Monsters of Folk did last year, Harrison, Harper and Arthur seamlessly blend their sounds here in a series of slow-burning, hypnotic tunes. 
While time will tell whether this is ultimately a one-off teaming or something more, this album is an undeniably lovely effort. When, on the album's closing track, the three men sing "I hope you find friends with whom you belong," it's hard for listeners not to think that the band's members have found exactly that in each other.


REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Billboard



This new Los Angeles-based supergroup unites jam-folk veterans Joseph Arthur and Ben Harper with George Harrison's son, Dhani, who in 2008 released the debut by his band thenewno2. 

Slightly psychedelic, mostly acoustic and uniformly tuneful, Fistful of Mercy's sound shouldn't surprise fans of any of those acts; nor, for that matter, should the appealingly casual quality of the nine songs on "As I Call You Down," which the musicians wrote in three days. (Longtime session drummer Jim Keltner contributed his talents in the studio, helping perhaps to keep the ship afloat.) 

On "Things Go 'Round," you can hear traces of the Beatles' music-hall whimsy, while "Father's Son" has a down-home country-blues feel. Elsewhere, the instrumental "30 Bones" features violinist Jessy Greene, a regular collaborator of Arthur's who has also performed with Pink and Foo Fighters. But the most memorable cuts here emphasize Fistful's earthy three-part harmonies, as in "I Don't Want to Waste Your Time" and "In Vain or True," both of which exude a rootsy back-porch glow.



REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Esprits Critiques


Tournée générale !


C’est au début de cette année que l’ami Marc – noble institution au sein de la blogosphère francophone qui a construit sa propre mythologie à coups de 800 et quelques articles, ancien comparse de la courte et inégale Radio Libre – m’a convié à intégrer l’équipe d’Esprits Critiques pour un CDI. Un peu comme Moe Szyslak inviterait un de ses piliers de comptoirs à partager ses fûts de Duff voire, de temps à autre, quelques spiritueux planqués dans la cave. Je lui suis plus que reconnaissant de m’avoir prêté les clefs de ce charmant établissement où j’épanche régulièrement notre passion commune en abreuvant, je l’espère, quelques heureux gosiers. Aujourd’hui, je fête ma centième critique en parlant de mon artiste fétiche. Champagne, tournée générale !

On ne saura jamais par quel malencontreux concours de circonstance Joseph Arthur a loupé le coche de la gloire. Mais on lui en sait gré. Le natif d’Akron, Ohio avait presque toutes les cartes en main pour devenir énorme(ke). Comme aucun article, peu ou prou, ne parle de lui sans évoquer Peter Gabriel, rappelons une dernière fois que c’est le boss de Real World qui l’a découvert et signé sur son label. Premier album, premier chef-d’œuvre, mais surtout la révélation d’un talent scénique extraterrestre. L’art de sampler une guitare dont certains s’extasient parfois chez une poignée de bricoleurs patentés, Arthur l’a élevé à un niveau de maîtrise d’autant plus insolent qu’il y a adjoint deux difficultés supplémentaires : une part aberrante d’improvisation et une sérieuse propension à jouer mort-bourré.

Collectionner les bootlegs de Joseph Arthur, qui a accumulé quelques milliers de concerts en quatorze ans, c’est constater un peu plus la boulimie créatrice du bonhomme, qui peint en chantant et expose ses toiles dans une galerie new-yorkaise, teste en moyenne une nouvelle chanson par performance, balance du jour au lendemain vingt morceaux inédits sur un blog, convertit en recueils de poèmes les textes qu’il n’a pas mis en musique. Artiste complet et ultra-prolifique, croisement surhumain entre Buckley, Basquiat, Beck et Burroughs (pour se limiter à la lettre B), monsieur a en plus écrit une des plus belles chansons de tous les temps : In the Sun, reprise entre autres par son patron de l’époque ou, plus récemment, par Michael Stipe et Chris Martin.

Mais faute d’une pub Ipod, d’un clip valable ou d’une performance au Superbowl, Joseph Arthur n’a jamais gagné que la haute estime de la profession, une fanbase peut-être décuplée depuis ses inoubliables débuts – ce qui ne fait toujours pas grand-monde – cependant que sa musique perdait inéluctablement en mystère ce qu’elle gagnait en maturité. Se tournant de plus en plus vers la théogonie américaine, les racines du rhythm n’blues et l’hygiène de vie déglinguée des tournées collectives avec un groupe médiocre (les Lonely Astronauts), Arthur s’est peu à peu saboté, quittant la maison-mère pour une structure autonome, délaissant les arrangements clairs-obscurs et les pulsions insectivores au profit d’un art plus terre-à-terre ; entendez : plutôt surface terrestre que catacombes.

Et voilà qu’aujourd’hui, l’Américain balaie nos espoirs d’un retour solo annoncé pour se consacrer à une nouvelle récréation, à moitié impromptue celle-là, mais en prestigieuse compagnie. Rien de moins, à ses côtés que Ben Harper et Dhani Harrison – le fils du Fab – autrement dit un trio particulièrement gratiné de guitar heroes discrets. Si Arthur semble être a priori le moins fameux des trois, l’écoute ne trompe pas : Fistful of Mercy est, de tout évidence, son projet. Outre la quasi omniprésence de sa voix sépulcrale, occasionnellement poussée dans un registre de tête moins fascinant, on reconnaît là un goût marqué pour des compositions immédiates, granuleuses et foncièrement intemporelles. Si, dans le passé, Joseph Arthur a su les couvrir d’inquiétants oripeaux, ses penchants de plus en plus prononcés pour la lumière ont eu raison de sa singularité.

Désormais, on ne peut que reconnaître en lui un brillant songwriter et un bluesman crédible, certainement pas le faiseur de miracles qui a signé cette dizaine de chansons essentielles capables de rivaliser encore avec le répertoire de ses plus glorieux aînés. Comparé à cet âge d’or, “As I Call You Down” fait évidemment pâle figure, au même titre que ce qu’a été le 21e siècle d’un dEUS ou d’un Pearl Jam, pour citer d’autres héros de jeunesse. On pourrait aussi bien évoquer la longue déliquescence de Ben Harper, autre génie du songwriting éternel trop vite tombé dans l’autisme – ou l’essoufflement – et dont la présence au sein du trio se limite à la portion congrue. Particulièrement en retrait au niveau du chant – alors qu’on sait combien ses complaintes habitées, chargées par deux siècles de gospel, peuvent se faire bouleversantes – Harper apporte au plus, au projet, une vague caution commerciale.

Quant à Dhani Harrison, il ne pouvait mieux trahir son héritage qu’en l’assumant totalement ; aussi, sur Father’s Son, invite-t-il l’évidence des Beatles dans un saloon empestant le tabac chiqué et l’alcool frelaté : « I’m still my father’s son. » Ces moments de déviance country ne sont pas rares, témoins le superbe instrumental 30 Bones et quelques ballades riches en foin et en poussière (With Whom You Belong, Restore Me,...). Les passages harrissoniens ne sont pas moins typés, eu égard à l’organe sans aspérités du fils de son père, injectant une vraie dose de pop lumineuse à Things Go Round ou menaçant presque d’entonner My Sweet Lord au cœur des chœurs d’In Vain or True – du reste, un très bel exercice de maux croisés, à l’instar de la plage titulaire.

La virtuosité de chacun des acteurs en présence ne fait par ailleurs aucun doute, et s’affiche dans ces jeux de cache-cache vocal et guitaristique, mais les chansons semblent trop souvent leur servir de prétexte et, au final, ce n’est que sur la pierre ogivale Fistful of Mercy que le trio se met, à l’inverse, réellement au service de la chanson. Une, deux, trois perles tout au plus sur cet album toutefois recommandable, qui vaut moins que la somme potentielle de ses parties mais davantage que leurs plus récents side-projects. Comme chez tous les supergroupes, l’amalgame tend certes à diluer les talents individuels, cependant l’émulation leur permet de rappeler un peu de l’éclat passé. Reste que, jusqu’à son dernier souffle sans doute, on continuera d’attendre de Joseph Arthur qu’il retrouve cette incandescente audace païenne grâce à laquelle, fut un temps, il s’autorisait à tutoyer les anges.

Article écrit par Laurent



Source

REVIEW : Fistful Of Mercy's As I Call You Down - Treblezine


by Miriam Lamey

For those who like bare-bones music, Fistful of Mercy’s debut – and perhaps only offering – As I Call You Down will be a collection of harmonic treats that have the ability to put a person right there in the room with the performers. But for the rest of the population, this well-intentioned album is a bit too one-note to spend a great deal of time in iPod rotation.

Undeniably a supergroup, Fistful of Mercy features the talents of Dhani Harrison (the late, great George Harrison’s son) Ben Harper and Joseph Arthur. All three have slightly differing music styles, but one thing is clear on As I Call You Down – they all have plenty of intense passion and love for their craft. This is particularly evident through the album’s complex yet near-perfect instrumentation – something that certainly stands out on the vocal-less “30 Bones” and fancifully quirky “Things Go Round,” which provides a pleasant sonic respite towards the album’s close. Some might call the track downright weird and eerie thanks to the squeakier vocals and overall fast pace, but since it doesn’t heavily feature rhythmic acoustic guitars – like the first three tracks – it has a curious freshness.

And yes, those first few tracks have to be mentioned, even if only to say that they prove it’s possible to have too much of a good thing. The album’s opener, “In Vain or True” gets the Beatles association and vibe out of the way through its tight harmonies and in its simplicity – just acoustic guitars, a bit of percussion and vocals. And no matter what, it’s a well-structured track. Yet the following songs, “I Don’t Want to Waste Your Time” and the album’s title track are so similar in structure and tone, that they needlessly blend together – and almost bring down the mood. Without bringing anything new so close to the album’s start, many a listener might even be prepared to switch off, despite the friendly and raw in-the-studio sound. However, keeping things au naturel doesn’t emit enough energy to keep the album’s pace going.

Fortunately, As I Call You Down has one utterly outstanding track, Father’s Son – an angsty, blues-ridden tune complete with rhythmic hand-clapping and a jarring melody. Undoubtedly, this wakes up the sleepy creativity thanks to its protest-song spirit that catapults listeners to the album’s second half. Yet while this tune is great, it’s not really enough to make this album any more than a pretty neat project and cool insight into how three very talented musicians came together to lay down some tracks.




2010/12/08

2010-12-08 - Fistful Of Mercy - Taratata, Paris


On Stage :

Performance for the France 2 TV show

Fistful Of Mercy :
Joseph Arthur (vocals & guitar)
Ben Harper (vocals & guitar)
Dhani Harrison (vocals & guitar)
Jessy Greene (violin)


Setlist :

fistful of mercy


Recording :



2010/12/05

2010-12-05 - Fistful of Mercy - La Cigale, Paris



On Stage :

Fistful Of Mercy :
Joseph Arthur (vocals & guitar)
Ben Harper (vocals & guitar)
Dhani Harrison (vocals & guitar)
Jessy Greene (violin)


Setlist :

i don't want to waste your time
in vain or true
as i call you down
buckets of rain (bob dylan cover)
30 bones
fistful of mercy
please me like you want to (ben harper cover)
restore me
in the sun
another john doe (thenewno2 cover)
things go 'round
father's son
to bring you my love (pj harvey cover)
pale blue eyes (the velvet underground cover)
scandalous
with whom you belong


Recording :

There is no complete record of this performance.
3 songs are missing (another john doe, things go 'round & pale blue eyes) .


2010-12-05 FOM La Cigale


Pictures ; by Flo

















2010/11/18

2010-11-18 - Fistful Of Mercy - Somerville Theatre, Somerville


On Stage :

Fistful Of Mercy : 
Joseph Arthur (vocals & guitar)
Ben Harper (vocals & guitar)
Dhani Harrison (vocals & guitar)
Jessy Greene (violin)

Alain Johannes was the opening act, and plays banjo on "Pale Blue Eyes" 


Setlist : 

i don't want to waste your time
in vain or true
as i call you down
buckets of rain (bob dylan cover)
30 bones
fistful of mercy
please me like you want to (ben harper cover)
restore me
in the sun
another john doe (thenewno2 cover)
things go 'round
father's son
to bring you my love (pj harvey cover)
pale blue eyes (the velvet underground cover)
scandalous
with whom you belong 


Recording :

Sadly, there's no audio recording of this event. 
If I am wrong, thank you to inform me by email.


Poster :



Review :

Fistful of Mercy packs punch (by Sarah Rodman)

On its recent debut album, Fistful of Mercy — the new collective featuring Ben Harper, Joseph Arthur, and Dhani Harrison — puts a pleasantly off-kilter twist on the Crosby, Stills, and Nash model, embellishing their harmony-saturated folk-rock tunes with ambient and psychedelic fillips. While enjoyable, the record feels a bit too ethereal in places.

In concert Thursday night at the Somerville Theatre, the trio — with a big boost from gracefully simpatico violinist and Sheffield native Jessy Greene — brought the songs of “As I Call You Down’’ to terra firma, fleshing them out and imbuing them with a warm soul over the course of an increasingly riveting, nearly two-hour show.

Voices and guitars interlocking Arthur, Harper, and Harrison ran through songs both rollicking — including blues stomper “Father’s Song’’ — and tender — “Restore Me,’’ often with Arthur not only singing and playing but keeping time on bass drum and tambourine with his feet. Each also performed one song from their respective catalogs.

The trio leavened the sometimes solemn mood of the music with levity, displaying a comic rapport as effortless as their harmony blend. Harrison, son of late Beatle George, joked about the heavy metal bent of the band’s name before launching into its decidedly nonmetal namesake song. Harper and Arthur poked fun at one another and enjoyed back and forth exchanges with the sold-out crowd.

But the music was the main attraction, and the trio played with obvious enjoyment.

Opening act, virtuosic guitarist Alain Johannes, returned to the stage for the stunning encore. The group moved from fierce (a noir-ish blues take on PJ Harvey’s “To Bring You My Love’’), to stark (a shiver-inducing reading of the Velvet Underground’s “Pale Blue Eyes’’), to funky (their own disco-roots mash-up “Scandalous’’).

The night was capped with a truly unplugged moment. Lining the front of the stage, guitars in hand, they sang, sans amplification, their optimistic ode to friendship “With Whom You Belong,’’ successfully coaxing the crowd to sing its refrain “I hope you find friends with whom you belong.’’ Clearly, the gentlemen in Fistful of Mercy have done just that.






Photos by Frank Donnelly :












2010/11/11

2010-11-11 - Fistful Of Mercy - Great American Music Hall, San Francisco



On Stage :

Fistful Of Mercy : 
Joseph Arthur (vocals & guitar)
Ben Harper (vocals & guitar)
Dhani Harrison (vocals & guitar)
Jessy Greene (violin)


Setlist : 

i don't want to waste your time
in vain or true
as i call you down
buckets of rain (bob dylan cover)
30 bones
fistful of mercy
please me like you want to (ben harper cover)
restore me
in the sun
another john doe (thenewno2 cover)
things go 'round
father's son
to bring you my love (pj harvey cover)
pale blue eyes (the velvet underground cover)
scandalous
with whom you belong


Recording :

Recorded by Daspyknows 
Recorded main floor halfway between stage and soundboard just right of center
Schoeps MK4 w/ NBox Tascam DR-2D 24 Bit 48K

The 2 last songs weren't recorded.


Reviews :

1) by Daspyknows, the taper of the recording :

"Thanks to Drew for the ticket.  Was looking forward to this and everything seemed easy.
No such luck.  Was checking gear and turns out I bought 4 dead 9 Volts at Walgreens.  
Meant trying to find batteries at the last minute.  I was prepared for a dance floor but 
it was tables and chairs.  I ended up to the right of a couple who just came to talk and
drnk.  During the opening act I asked them to be quiet twice.  No luck.  Between sets I 
asked again.  At one point the guy said maybe we should duct tape his girlfriend to keep
her quiet (he was lounder).  I reached into my backpack and pulled out a roll.  Shut them
up for a bit. 

Fistful of Mercy came out.  They were great.  I started the recorder when I expected them 
to come out.  Security was always close by so I couldnt mess with the gear.  Unfortunately I 
miscalculated the memory on the card and lost the last few songs.  I knew I was close but 
couldn't check due to security.  Kicking myself because the performance of Pale Blue Eyes 
was amazing.  Hopefully other sources will appear from the tour.  These guys are good, having
fun playing together and really seemed to enjoy each other.  

Do not sell this, support these guys by going to see them or bying their new release."


2) by Andy Young, for COS :

Fistful of Mercy makes friends in San Francisco

When a band opens up with a song called “I Don’t Want to Waste Your Time”, you normally become a little cautious. When that band has Ben fucking Harper in it, there’s nothing to worry about.

That is, at least, what everyone at San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall discovered Thursday night. Harper’s newest project Fistful of Mercy, an acoustic rock trio with singer-songwriter Joseph Arthur and Dhani Harrison (George’s son), has no business being as good as it was after less than a year in existence.

After the crowd frustratingly chattered over a melancholy opening set by Them Crooked Vultures/Queens of the Stone Age collaborator Alain Johannes, FoM came out to a huge ovation, and the love remained throughout the evening.

With help from As I Call You Down violinist Jessy Greene, the trio strummed through all nine tracks on its October debut album, and then some. And “then some,” of course, means lots of bonus material. FoM kept the show fresh with plenty of crowd-pleasers, including covers of Bob Dylan’s “Buckets of Rain”, PJ Harvey’s “To Bring You My Love”, and The Velvet Underground’s “Pale Blue Eyes”. The band also threw in a new piece called “Scandalous” (sample lyric: “Scandalous / You’re so motherfuckin’ scandalous”).

The high point, for better or for worse, consisted of FoM playing a string of non-FoM songs. Halfway through the main set, upon finishing “Fistful of Mercy”, Arthur blurted out a request for a Harper song. Harper, a Southern California native, stalled by addressing the crowd: “How about some hostility for the San Francisco Giants?” After some extended screaming and a “Let’s go, Giants” chant, Harper, with his friends’ help, transitioned into his “Please Me Like You Want To”. His buddies traded the spotlight from here, with Arthur busting out his early single “In the Sun” and Harrison taking a seat at a grand piano for thenewno2 number “Another John Doe”.

While the performance was marked by plenty of impressive musical improvisation — several shining moments from Greene, a duel between Harrison and Arthur, and as expected, Harper’s lap slide guitar — the verbal improv did its part in making this a memorable show. All three members made cracks about the amount of weed in the air; someone apparently even threw a joint at Arthur. The band played a game of rock, paper, scissors, and joked about Harrison’s backstage skateboarding. Best of all, they were really proud of their Conan appearance — “Y’all see us on Conan last night?” quipped Arthur at one point, out of the blue. And introducing “Father’s Son”, Harrison said, “We did this song with Tom Morello last night and it sounded like ‘Killing in the Name of’. That wasn’t really our intention."

Harrison, playing in San Francisco for the first time, showed some nerves; his eyes never fixated on the audience, and he had to restart “Another John Doe”. Still, he came through and was, needless to say, a crowd favorite.

None of what FoM did was more or less than what you’d expect. No theremin experiments, no heavy metal. The only surprise was how well these three synchronized all night. There’s no doubt these three are good friends and enjoy being on stage with each other. Fistful of Mercy is essentially just three dudes who happened to get together and jam, and now they have a solid album and a hell of a live show to boot. There’s just something so right about this."








2010/11/10

2010-11-10 - Conan O'Brien Show, NBC TV, Los Angeles


On Stage :

Fistful Of Mercy :
Joseph Arthur (vocals & guitar)
Ben Harper (vocals & guitar)
Dhani Harrison (vocals & guitar)
Jessy Greene (violin)



with Tom Morello on guitar.


Setlist :

Father's Son


Recording :



INTERVIEW : 2010-11-10 Fistful of Mercy skates onto the music scene (by Denise Quan)


Fistful of Mercy is made up of musicians Dhani Harrison, Ben Harper, Joseph Arthur
The trio wrote and recorded nine songs over three days
Harrison, who is the son of Beatle George Harrison, put the album out on his label

To hear a longer cut of the interview, you can subscribe to "Soundcheck Uncut" on iTunes or on www.cnn.com/podcasts (or click HERE)

Dhani Harrison cruises past the conference table on his skateboard and pops a trick in the corner of Hot Records -- the label founded by his father, the late Beatle George Harrison. A couple of minutes later, Joseph Arthur skates down the hall. Then Ben Harper walks in, a black-and-white board tucked under his arm.

So much for networking on a golf course.

The new trio Fistful of Mercy had its genesis at a Southern California skate park. Harrison, who fronts the indie band thenewno2, bumped into Harper -- then in the midst of working with his rock project, Relentless 7.

"When you're skateboarding, you don't really have time to socialize. It's more like trying not to hurt yourself," says Harrison. "We met again at Lollapalooza, and it was like, 'Oh hi, skateboard guy.' And we talked about doing some songs."

In the meantime, Harper had made plans to enter the studio with Arthur, his longtime friend. "It was all done via text messages really," recalls Arthur. "He asked me if I knew Dhani Harrison, and I said, 'No, is he in our band?' "

The three musicians ended up writing and recording nine songs over the course of three highly productive days at the Carriage House in Los Angeles. Most of the songs are acoustic and feature three-part harmonies.

"I've heard it called a folk record, and I've heard it called a pop record. I've heard it called a soul record," says Harper. "It really is a chameleon of a record."

Its lyrics also have a chameleon-like quality. The album tells the story of someone trying to figure out where he stands in a relationship. Given the fact that Harper recently filed for divorce from actress Laura Dern, his wife of five years, one might think it is a record full of breakup songs -- especially since the CD opens with the line, "Just 'cause you say so don't make it true. Just 'cause it's over don't mean we're through."

"I can see them interpreted as that," Harper says. "It's a record that will reflect where you're at, more than us being able to say what it's like."

Harrison, however, says the lyrics tell the journey of Fistful of Mercy. "I see the record as more people getting to know each other and testing each other's boundaries," he says.

"The first song we wrote together was 'I Don't Want to Waste Your Time,' because we all are a little nervous about wasting each other's time," Arthur says. "The album's kind of like a conversation -- a three-way conversation -- and sort of a document of friends becoming brothers."

CNN spoke with the three members of Fistful of Mercy as they rehearsed for their first tour, which kicks off Tuesday in Seattle.

CNN: You came in working off a phrase, "You love like I love."

Harrison: When I saw Ben, we kind of recognized each other as people that were going to be friends in life. And as I was leaving, I was like, "I like you because you're cool. You love like I love." And he just laughed and said, "That's the first line of the song we're going to write." Sounds kind of corny, but it actually was true.

CNN: Did you guys write individually, or did you write in the same room all together, throwing phrases and words out?

Harrison: Both. It was like, "How about this?" "No!" "OK, next line." "Yeah!" Boom, boom. It just kind of naturally happened.

Harper: We had something called the Lyric Police. It worked.

Arthur: It's like we tricked each other's egos in a way, because it's like a cartoony way of being able to edit each other's stuff without becoming offended in any way. Plus we had three days, so we kind of got this Brill Building vibe of like, "We just have to get this record done." So you didn't get engaged in a possessive way. It was more like we were one working towards an objective. They say they haven't invented time travel yet, but I think they have. It's called a recording studio. You can fit a month into three days.

Harper: The time constraint works as a discipline to stand up and be the player that hopefully you are, the singer that you are, the writer that you are.

CNN: If I were going to think about an album the three of you might do together, I don't think this is the sound I would have come up with, necessarily.

Harper: Joe brought a lot of equipment -- samplers, digital gear effects. Dhani brought ukuleles, and I kind of went in-between. I brought some acoustic and some electric. And it could have gone in any number of directions, but it pretty quickly defined itself.

Harrison: In my band, I'm kind of used to being the lead guitar player and the lead singer. As soon as I sat down with these guys -- I mean, I don't know if you've heard Joe play, but he is one of the most amazing guitar players that I've heard. And Ben is -- enough said, you know. And so I just kind of gave up on that idea. So I became the keyboard player, which is the first time I've ever played keyboards in a band.

Harper: Well, everything you touch, you play. I think I've seen you sit down with a banjo and write a song in five minutes.

Harrison: It was really bad, though.

Harper: Actually, it was a great song, I'm afraid, and I was a little bit jealous.

CNN: Dhani, you put this album out on your record label, Hot Records.

Harrison: It just happened that Ben was coming out of his deal, Joe puts his records out [on his own label], and we've never put anything out other than newno2 records, but we had the system in place. I said to the guys, why don't we just put an album out on my label? And I couldn't believe it when they all said, "Yes." And then I got to be the record boss, which is a bit of a joke. It's all very family-oriented, ma and pa kind of style. You know, we're all pals.

Harper: I was blown away, because we sat down to do the art, and he was talking about UV spot varnish, and code numbers and Pantone numbers. But even better than that, there's nothing misspelled on the record, and all the colors are the colors that we picked. So often, you get something back, and it's sort of factory-pressed. But this felt like something handcrafted.

CNN: Ben, when you came into this room, you said, "I'm going to sit on the side." Is it a relief to not have to be the guy to answer the questions all the time?

Harper: For me, it is.

Harrison: For me, too.

Arthur: For me, three.

CNN: Then how do you get anything done, if nobody wants to be the decision-maker?

Arthur: We take turns leading. Of course, there's an adequate amount of tension to make rock and roll together. You don't want a tensionless environment, but there's a healthy amount. You can trust it. There's a load of love and respect, and I think we all have kind of an innate feel about when we should lead and when we should follow.

CNN: So do we call this a debut album, because there's more coming up?

Harrison: We didn't get the hang of making the first record, because it was done so effortlessly. We want to spend some time together, and write some more records. Even if it's just to hang out.

CNN: How is the second album going to sound compared to the first one?

Harrison: It's kind of like saying, "How would you describe a painting, and how's it different from the one you haven't painted yet?"

Arthur: When you write a poem, you write one line, and that line informs the next line, informs the next line, informs the next line -- and then suddenly, it's a poem. So we're in the process of just writing lines right now. So it's hard to know what the poem's going to be.

Harrison: Whatever it sounds like, it'll definitely be fun to make.